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Can Jaden Springer take a leap in his second season?

Jaden Springer is still just 19 years old, so the Sixers will likely remain patient with the 2021 first-rounder — unless he makes serious strides.

NBA: Summer League-Philadelphia 76ers at Brooklyn Nets Stephen R. Sylvanie-USA TODAY Sports

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be profiling every player currently on the Sixers’ roster ahead of training camp, which begins on September 28.

Jaden Springer

Age: 19

Contract-status: $2.1 million for 2022-23; team options for the 2023-2024 and 2024-2025

Springer is 19 years of age, yet mystery continues to surround him. He’s coming off a rollercoaster of a Summer League where most expected him to shine. He had his moments, most notably on the defensive end, however he struggled with offensive consistency and quick decision making.

Springer only played in two games for the Sixers’ Las Vegas Summer League before being shut down, but he managed to put up promising numbers with the Delaware Blue Coats in the G League. In the 2021-22 season he averaged 14.9 points, 4.6 rebounds, 2.6 assists, 1.8 steals, and 1.1 blocks per game across 19 games. While the basic production is solid, his efficiency from beyond the arc left more to be desired. He averaged 24.1 percent on 3.1 attempts per game.

The offensive end and shooting mechanics are still a work in progress, but Springer’s athleticism and defense has shown some impressive flashes.

Season outlook: Springer spent the majority of his time in the G League with the Blue Coats last season, and that’ll likely be the case for this upcoming year as well. The Sixers backcourt rotation is loaded with Tyrese Maxey, James Harden, De’Anthony Melton, Shake Milton, and Isaiah Joe all in the mix for time. It’s hard seeing Springer beat out any of those guys, barring a huge jump or injury.

History has shown that the Sixers have thrown some second-year guys into the rotation on a need-basis, and that might very well be the case for Springer in the second half of this season. I don’t think they’ll ever go to him on a consistent basis this year, but they might thrown him in if there’s a few seconds on the clock and they need a stop at the end of a quarter — similar to what they did with Rayjon Tucker a few years ago.

Springer’s shooting and offensive consistency problems are real, but it’s worth noting that he turns 20 in a few months — which is still younger than most of the people taken in this past draft. He still has time to figure things out, and the flashes are there and somewhat real.

Springer’s defense and athleticism are present, and the offense simply needs to catch up. There’s a very solid argument that there’s a NBA player within him if he can clean up his release and shoot the ball well from the perimeter.

Everything lines up that we will probably be watching Springer in the G League for the majority of the time. While that may seem like a bummer, he’s still very young — and can sharpen his skills with playing time.