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Sixers Unveil New City Jerseys

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They’re not what we expected

Philadelphia 76ers vs. Los Angeles Lakers Photo by Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE via Getty Images

The Sixers had been doing a marketing rollout, featuring Allen Iverson and Ben Simmons, for about a week, seemingly indicating they were releasing an homage to the black 2000-01-era jerseys. Now, opinion is divided among the Philadelphia fan base as to whether those uniforms were actually “good” or not, but the nostalgia surrounding Iverson and that Finals run alone made it a worthwhile revisit for an alternate jersey. Then, the new uniforms dropped this morning, and...(allow me to use a callback to a very old internet meme)...WHAT ARE THOSE?!?

The Boathouse Row motif is a nice idea in theory, but it came out looking way too busy. The font is bleh and the drop shadow is amateurish. The “TTP” not too sneakily hidden smack dab in the middle of the design is the only thing I like about it. The Boathouse Row Total Landscaping and Great Value Nuggets jersey jokes are already flying. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but I think it’s safe to say this will not result in the sales bonanza the Sixers marketing department might have hoped to see.

You can read more about the process behind this jersey design in Zach Lowe’s ESPN Insider article.


Update: Here is the Sixers’ official press release regarding the new jerseys:

“The Philadelphia 76ers unveiled today its 2020-21 City Edition uniform, presented in partnership with Official Jersey Patch Partner, StubHub. In continuing to spotlight the team’s connection to the rich history of Philadelphia, the uniform showcases Boathouse Row, an iconic U.S. Historic National Landmark that runs along the Schuylkill River, just west of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

With black as the uniform’s primary color, the design is inspired by the one-of-a-kind Philadelphia view Boathouse Row provides at night. In the wake of the country’s bicentennial, each boathouse was lined with lights in the late 1970s, which reflect each evening on the river, creating the visual mimicked on the uniform.

“We love telling stories through the 76ers brand, specifically of our great city and always honoring our history,” Philadelphia 76ers President Chris Heck said. “This year, we celebrate our city edition uniform by blending the old and the new specifically for the greatest fans in the world to enjoy.”

The 2020-21 City Edition was designed in collaboration with two-time All-Star and 2019-20 All-Defensive First Team selection Ben Simmons, who in his rookie season requested that Heck develop a black uniform. In turn, Heck offered Simmons a “deal.” If Simmons were to earn 2017-18 Rookie of the Year honors, he’d be included in the uniform design process the following year. After joining Hall of Famer Oscar Robertson as the only two rookies in NBA history to post at least 15.0 points, 8.0 rebounds and 8.0 assists per game, Simmons captured the award and became an integral part of the design’s development.

“Growing up in Australia, I always associated the 76ers with the black uniform that Allen Iverson wore in the early 2000s. I’m a lover of both fashion and basketball, so to combine the two and be part of the design process for the first black 76ers uniform in over a decade was amazing,” Simmons said. “I’m grateful the team included me from the jump and can’t wait to wear this jersey next season.”

The team’s first primarily black uniform since 2008-09 also ties in the classic red, white and blue on the edges of the uniform’s top, as well as on the waistband of the shorts. The text “Philadelphia” is printed in white, with a blue drop shadow, across the front of the uniform, beneath the imagery of Boathouse Row, with the player’s number above it. The back of the uniform features the continuation of the Boathouse Row theme with the player’s number above it and their name below. The Boathouse Row design is two-tone, featuring a white color representative of the light fixtures on each boathouse and a glossy black, mirroring the reflection that the Schuylkill projects back onto the boathouses. Also seen on the waistband is the historic Liberty Bell, while “hidden” underneath the flap of the shorts is the severed snake, derived from Benjamin Franklin’s political cartoon of 1754.”

Poll

New City Edition Uniforms?

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  • 46%
    Yea
    (215 votes)
  • 53%
    Nay
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