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Overnight developments in the Bryan Colangelo Twitter scandal

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NBA: Philadelphia 76ers at Atlanta Hawks Brett Davis-USA TODAY Sports

In the wake of Woodergate, Sixers fans, hopeful yet increasingly pessimistic, await a revelation. Like Moses and the Israelites wandering the desert, the fanbase navigates the scandal as tortured souls owed mercy. The controversy has brought shame and embarrassment to the franchise; yet more and more, it seems like there’s a real possibility heads may not roll.

According to Adrain Wojnarowski of ESPN, “The Philadelphia 76ers ownership group, including CEO Scott O’Neill, met for several hours in New York on Tuesday evening to discuss whether the findings of a probe into president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo necessitate his firing...A decision could be reached as soon as Wednesday, league sources said.”

Woj’s report also comments that, “Regardless of Colangelo’s future, the Sixers are prepared to make coach Brett Brown front and center in the July free-agent presentations, league sources said...The Sixers could turn to assistant general managers Marc Eversley and Ned Cohen to navigate the Sixers through the June 21 draft and July free agency. The Sixers plan to pursue free agents LeBron James and Paul George with a maximum contract slot.”

As frustrating as that approach might be, it gets worse. Jon Johnson of 94.1 WIP said on the air last night (June 5th) that the organization is holding out hope that Colangelo can remain GM of the team.

All of this news leads to the question: does Josh Harris and the rest of the ownership group know what they are doing? Because on one hand, you understand why they wouldn’t rush to fire Colangelo. There’s legal ramifications to making such a move. And if Colangelo was truly unaware of his wife’s alleged Twitter accounts, I can understand why Harris & company would feel caution in letting Bryan go. I don’t agree with it, but I get it. But on the other hand, considering the information available, you have to wonder why the team is so enamored with Colangelo that they would retain him through this mess.

Are they (ownership) so in doubt of their own ability to find a replacement that they feel managing the public relations disaster is worth keeping BC? I mean, I just can’t understand why this group feels like Colangelo is such a necessity. Why is he so important to this ownership? WHY?

Judging by Woj’s report, specifically the phrase, “A decision could be reached as soon as Wednesday”, I think we’re going to finally get some answers today. The executives met for hours last night AND it’s been a week since the story broke, for crying out loud. It’s about time the situation is addressed. I wouldn’t be at all shocked if the organization allows Colangelo to remain in his role. And I believe they’d have the full support of Adam Silver as well as a majority of the owners in the league.

Look, I don’t like the idea of advocating for someone’s firing. But a question that I need answered: if the organization retains Colangelo yet is already planning on rolling out Brett Brown (and maybe Marc Eversley and Ned Cohen) to recruit free agents, then, um... what exactly is the point of keeping Colangelo? I mean, that’s what GMs do right? A big part of their job is being at the forefront of establishing relationships with prospective players. If his reputation is so stained that the organization turns to the head coach and assistant GMs to pitch free agents on Philadelphia, what makes Colangelo valuable to the executives? I just. don’t. get it.