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Jordan McRae Offered Non-Guaranteed Contract By 76ers

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Sixers would have had to forfeit McRae's rights if a contract wasn't offered.

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NBA teams are assumed to hold a player's draft rights up until the moment they sign. For the most part, that's the case. Players good enough to get drafted usually are good enough to sign elsewhere in the world if they know an NBA team won't give them money, or will cut them immediately. Chu Chu Maduabum keeps picking up work, to this day. Arsalan Kazemi played in Iran. Marshall Henderson played professional basketball in Iraq!

If you're a basketball player with even modest renown, you can find work. Which is why the assumption I mentioned above is made. But that's not the case - teams only hold players' rights to the extent that they work in professional basketball. If they are unsigned up to a point close to training camps - which start in a couple of weeks - the player needs to be offer the required tender.

We've discussed the required tender before on Liberty Ballers, most recently with J.P. Tokoto and most notably with K.J. McDaniels. Teams that draft second round picks are required to issue an offer to their second round picks - a one-year deal at the minimum with no guaranteed money - as part of draft requirements. If after the year the player was drafted, the team must offer the player the deal or lose his rights.

And Jordan McRae, who was in this position, was offered the required tender by the 76ers to ensure his rights are retained. Derek Bodner was the first to confirm that the team offered the contract. McRae would need to sign with an overseas team or negotiating a different deal; otherwise, his odds of being a Sixer long-term appear slim.